• Ship Breakers | Bangladesh

    Broadcast: 17 February 2013 on Sunday Night, Seven Network, Australia. It's one of the most jaw-dropping sights of the modern world. For as far as the eye can see, along a stretch of coastline in Bangladesh, hundreds of mammoth supertankers lie beached on the sand. This is where the world's ships come to die. Tim joins the thousands of workers, some of them children, who are paid just 47 cents a day to break up these rusting giants with their bare hands. AWARDS: Winner: Walkley Award for Camerawork, Australia (2013) CREW: Reporter / Camera: Tim Noonan Producer: Ali Russell Sound: Dan Abbott Editor: Jimmy Hamilton SUBSCRIBE: Youtube ► http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=timnoonantv SOCIALS: Facebook ► http://facebook.com/timnoonantv Instagram ► http://instagram.com/timn...

    published: 16 Jul 2013
  • Asbestos abatement at S N Corporation,Green ship recycling yard, Chittagong, Bangladesh Part I

    Asbestos abatement unit at S N Corporation,Green ship recycling yard, Chittagong, Bangladesh Part I

    published: 02 May 2011
  • S N CORPORATION PRESENTATION GREEN SHIP RECYCLING YARD IN CHITTAGONG.wmv

    S N CORPORATION PRESENTATION GREEN SHIP RECYCLING YARD IN CHITTAGONG , BEFORE & AFTER ISO & OHSAS IMPLEMENTATION AND CERTIFICATION

    published: 06 Feb 2011
  • Mr Bhupat of International steel corporation, ship recycling yard Alang, giving feedback for Netpeckers training

    published: 09 Jun 2011
  • Bangladesh 2013 Part 1

    Bangladesh is a friendly but frequently misunderstood country. It usually only gets a mention by western media when a disaster occurs. Few tourist go there, which is good for those that do, but not so for the Bangladesh economy. This is the first of a series of videos shot on a visit I made in January 2013. Part one starts with a visit to the spectacular and surreal ship breaking yards on the beach north of Chittagong. Hundreds of ships are dismantled here each year using mostly manual labour, very little mechanisation is employed. The work is hard, dirty and dangerous but it gives thousands of men employment and wages to feed their families. Change must take place, but not at the expense of creating starvation conditions for these people. It took Great Britain over two hundred years to cr...

    published: 10 Dec 2015
  • Ship breaking workers at Alang, Bhavnagar

    Alang beach (Gujurat, India) is one of the main ship breaking yards in the world. Alang is a census town in Bhavnagar district in the Indian state of Gujarat, India.Alang is known as land of lakes and temples. However today Alang is known for being Asia's largest and world's one of the most important Ship Recycling Yard where various material like Melting scrap, Cast Iron Scrap (Beed), Rolling Material, Profile Plates, Marine Machinery, Marine Engine, Diesel Generating Sets, Electric Motors and so many other items which are available in huge quantity of various qualities are mostly tested and certified by the world famous Lloyds Certifying Co. of England. As per the international reports, more ships for demolition are expected for Alang as Ocean freight is very down. Presently, Alang & ...

    published: 15 Jun 2015
  • The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh VICE INTL

    published: 22 Nov 2015
  • Dangerous Work! Ship Graveyard in Bangladesh - Indian Ocean With Simon Reeve - BBC

    Simon visits the shi breaking beaches of Chittagong, where poor and badly treated Bangladeshi workers break up old container ships for scrap metal. Subscribe to the BBC Worldwide channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=BBCWorldwide BBC Worldwide Channel: http://www.youtube.com/BBCWorldwide This is a channel from BBC Worldwide who help fund new BBC programmes.

    published: 06 May 2014
  • Constructing A Pre-Fabricated Ship - 1942 Educational Documentary - WDTVLIVE42

    Shows the step-by-step construction of a pre-fabricated ship, the SS Robert E. Peary Liberty class naval cargo ship at Permanente Metals Corporation No. 2 Yard in Richmond, California. Filmed during the early days of America's involvement in World War Two, this ship set a record breaking time for construction at just 4 days, 15 hours and 29 minutes after the keel was laid down. The film shows all aspects of construction, as well as detailed scenes of activities at the dockyards and the successful launching of the ship. WDTVLIVE42 - Transport, technology, and general interest movies from the past - newsreels, documentaries & publicity films from my archives.

    published: 03 Mar 2016
  • "Captain John's" ship JADRAN scrapped

    As seen on Jun.17, 2015, the hull of the ALGOMA PROGRESS is being dismantled and scrapped at the Marine Recycling Corp. site on the Welland Canal at Port Colborne. Also, the front-pilothouse-steamer AMERICAN FORTITUDE (reg. at Wilmington, Del.) is seen, waiting for scrapping, and the JADRAN (formerly known in Toronto as Captain John's Seafood Restaurant) is also seen, waiting to be scrapped. By Aug.1, 2015 (as seen at 02:16), the JADRAN has had her superstructure removed almost down to the hull, while large sections of the superstructure now sit on the shore. Also see my video of JADRAN being towed into the Welland Canal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irZc4nvwKuk

    published: 04 Aug 2015
  • Asbestosis: The slow poison killing ship-breaking workers

    Workers' deaths at the ship-breaking yards of Chittagong are a common incident, as is environmental poisoning. But researchers have now detected one deadly illness that has been silently affecting the workers for decades. Many ships that come to the yards are filled with the mineral asbestos, used in the 1980s and '90s for insulation on high-heat areas such as boilers and steam pipes. It has since been banned across the world for safety concerns. In a recent study, Bangladesh Occupational Safety, Health and Environment Foundation (OSHE) found that almost 33% of the ship-breaking workers are affected by asbestosis, an incurable disease caused by breathing the mineral in the form of dust or fume.

    published: 02 Feb 2017
  • Ship breaking workers daily life

    Ship breaking workers daily life,Chittagong, Bangladesh

    published: 25 Jun 2015
  • Biggest cruise ship catastrophe ever

    Disaster at sea - cruise ship disaster shipwreck. Costa Concordia (Italian pronunciation: [ˈkɔsta konˈkɔrdja]) was a Concordia-class cruise ship built in 2004 by the Fincantieri's Sestri Ponente yards in Italy and operated from 2005 until 2012 by Costa Crociere (a subsidiary of Carnival Corporation). It was wrecked off the coast of Isola del Giglio in Italy on 13 January 2012. The ship was damaged due to a contact with a submerged rock and capsized hours later and was subsequently declared a total loss and later towed to the port of Genoa where scrapping operations began.[3] The name Concordia was intended to express the wish for "continuing harmony, unity, and peace between European nations."[4] Costa Concordia was the first of the Concordia-class cruise ships, followed by similar ships...

    published: 25 Jun 2017
  • Ship Breaking in Bangladesh

    Children are among the 30,000 workers who labor under perilous and grueling conditions in Bangladesh to break apart ships that once carried the freight of the worlds G-20 nations, according to a report issued today by the National Labor Committee. The new report, Where Ships and Workers Go to Die: Ship-breaking in Bangladesh and the Failure of Global Institutions to Protect Worker Rights, documents the plight of workers who dismantle ships of the G-20, working 12-hour shifts, seven days a week, under primitive conditions for wages of just 22 to 32 cents an hour—doing one of the most dangerous jobs in the world. Charles Kernaghan, director of the National Labor Committee, challenged the G-20 ministers to take up the issue: The G-20 leaders must be held accountable for having miserably fai...

    published: 22 Sep 2009
  • Ship Recycling Yard

    green Ship Recycling

    published: 21 Jul 2015
  • Customer feedback from Mr Barkat CEO of S N Corporation Green ship recycling yard .

    Customer feedback from Mr Barkat CEO of S N Corporation Green ship recycling yard for ISO & OHSAS consulting and training by Netpeckers & GESS

    published: 05 Feb 2011
Ship Breakers | Bangladesh

Ship Breakers | Bangladesh

  • Order:
  • Duration: 15:50
  • Updated: 16 Jul 2013
  • views: 531721
videos
Broadcast: 17 February 2013 on Sunday Night, Seven Network, Australia. It's one of the most jaw-dropping sights of the modern world. For as far as the eye can see, along a stretch of coastline in Bangladesh, hundreds of mammoth supertankers lie beached on the sand. This is where the world's ships come to die. Tim joins the thousands of workers, some of them children, who are paid just 47 cents a day to break up these rusting giants with their bare hands. AWARDS: Winner: Walkley Award for Camerawork, Australia (2013) CREW: Reporter / Camera: Tim Noonan Producer: Ali Russell Sound: Dan Abbott Editor: Jimmy Hamilton SUBSCRIBE: Youtube ► http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=timnoonantv SOCIALS: Facebook ► http://facebook.com/timnoonantv Instagram ► http://instagram.com/timnoonantv Website ► http://www.timnoonan.tv
https://wn.com/Ship_Breakers_|_Bangladesh
Asbestos abatement at S N Corporation,Green ship recycling yard, Chittagong, Bangladesh Part I

Asbestos abatement at S N Corporation,Green ship recycling yard, Chittagong, Bangladesh Part I

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:44
  • Updated: 02 May 2011
  • views: 1079
videos
Asbestos abatement unit at S N Corporation,Green ship recycling yard, Chittagong, Bangladesh Part I
https://wn.com/Asbestos_Abatement_At_S_N_Corporation,Green_Ship_Recycling_Yard,_Chittagong,_Bangladesh_Part_I
S N CORPORATION PRESENTATION GREEN SHIP RECYCLING YARD IN CHITTAGONG.wmv

S N CORPORATION PRESENTATION GREEN SHIP RECYCLING YARD IN CHITTAGONG.wmv

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:38
  • Updated: 06 Feb 2011
  • views: 222
videos
S N CORPORATION PRESENTATION GREEN SHIP RECYCLING YARD IN CHITTAGONG , BEFORE & AFTER ISO & OHSAS IMPLEMENTATION AND CERTIFICATION
https://wn.com/S_N_Corporation_Presentation_Green_Ship_Recycling_Yard_In_Chittagong.Wmv
Mr Bhupat of International steel corporation, ship recycling yard Alang, giving feedback for Netpeckers training

Mr Bhupat of International steel corporation, ship recycling yard Alang, giving feedback for Netpeckers training

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:24
  • Updated: 09 Jun 2011
  • views: 65
videos
https://wn.com/Mr_Bhupat_Of_International_Steel_Corporation,_Ship_Recycling_Yard_Alang,_Giving_Feedback_For_Netpeckers_Training
Bangladesh 2013 Part 1

Bangladesh 2013 Part 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:34
  • Updated: 10 Dec 2015
  • views: 111041
videos
Bangladesh is a friendly but frequently misunderstood country. It usually only gets a mention by western media when a disaster occurs. Few tourist go there, which is good for those that do, but not so for the Bangladesh economy. This is the first of a series of videos shot on a visit I made in January 2013. Part one starts with a visit to the spectacular and surreal ship breaking yards on the beach north of Chittagong. Hundreds of ships are dismantled here each year using mostly manual labour, very little mechanisation is employed. The work is hard, dirty and dangerous but it gives thousands of men employment and wages to feed their families. Change must take place, but not at the expense of creating starvation conditions for these people. It took Great Britain over two hundred years to create safe industrial practices and provide the workforce with good working conditions, we cannot expect Bangladesh to achieve these changes overnight. Following the shipbreaking sequence there are some scenes at a station near Chittagong. Then video shot during a daylight journey from Chittagong to Dhaka on the Sudarna Express. Note the many snack vendors, there is no need to go hungry on a Bangladesh train! The 320km line is currently being doubled throughout to increase capacity and shorten journey time.
https://wn.com/Bangladesh_2013_Part_1
Ship breaking workers at Alang, Bhavnagar

Ship breaking workers at Alang, Bhavnagar

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:13
  • Updated: 15 Jun 2015
  • views: 7330
videos
Alang beach (Gujurat, India) is one of the main ship breaking yards in the world. Alang is a census town in Bhavnagar district in the Indian state of Gujarat, India.Alang is known as land of lakes and temples. However today Alang is known for being Asia's largest and world's one of the most important Ship Recycling Yard where various material like Melting scrap, Cast Iron Scrap (Beed), Rolling Material, Profile Plates, Marine Machinery, Marine Engine, Diesel Generating Sets, Electric Motors and so many other items which are available in huge quantity of various qualities are mostly tested and certified by the world famous Lloyds Certifying Co. of England. As per the international reports, more ships for demolition are expected for Alang as Ocean freight is very down. Presently, Alang & Sosiya has 94 ships under demolition. Courtesy: http://www.alangtoday.com/ This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The Wilderness Films India collection comprises of 50, 000+ hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM / SR 1080i High Definition, Alexa, SR, XDCAM and 4K. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Please subscribe to our channel wildfilmsindia on Youtube for a steady stream of videos from across India. Also, visit and enjoy your journey across India at www.clipahoy.com , India's first video-based social networking experience! Reach us at rupindang@gmail.com and admin@wildfilmsindia.com
https://wn.com/Ship_Breaking_Workers_At_Alang,_Bhavnagar
The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh VICE INTL

The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh VICE INTL

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:14
  • Updated: 22 Nov 2015
  • views: 95
videos
https://wn.com/The_Ship_Breakers_Of_Bangladesh_Vice_Intl
Dangerous Work! Ship Graveyard in Bangladesh  - Indian Ocean With Simon Reeve - BBC

Dangerous Work! Ship Graveyard in Bangladesh - Indian Ocean With Simon Reeve - BBC

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:06
  • Updated: 06 May 2014
  • views: 50150
videos
Simon visits the shi breaking beaches of Chittagong, where poor and badly treated Bangladeshi workers break up old container ships for scrap metal. Subscribe to the BBC Worldwide channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=BBCWorldwide BBC Worldwide Channel: http://www.youtube.com/BBCWorldwide This is a channel from BBC Worldwide who help fund new BBC programmes.
https://wn.com/Dangerous_Work_Ship_Graveyard_In_Bangladesh_Indian_Ocean_With_Simon_Reeve_BBC
Constructing A Pre-Fabricated Ship - 1942 Educational Documentary - WDTVLIVE42

Constructing A Pre-Fabricated Ship - 1942 Educational Documentary - WDTVLIVE42

  • Order:
  • Duration: 42:57
  • Updated: 03 Mar 2016
  • views: 9082
videos
Shows the step-by-step construction of a pre-fabricated ship, the SS Robert E. Peary Liberty class naval cargo ship at Permanente Metals Corporation No. 2 Yard in Richmond, California. Filmed during the early days of America's involvement in World War Two, this ship set a record breaking time for construction at just 4 days, 15 hours and 29 minutes after the keel was laid down. The film shows all aspects of construction, as well as detailed scenes of activities at the dockyards and the successful launching of the ship. WDTVLIVE42 - Transport, technology, and general interest movies from the past - newsreels, documentaries & publicity films from my archives.
https://wn.com/Constructing_A_Pre_Fabricated_Ship_1942_Educational_Documentary_Wdtvlive42
"Captain John's" ship JADRAN scrapped

"Captain John's" ship JADRAN scrapped

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:08
  • Updated: 04 Aug 2015
  • views: 2569
videos
As seen on Jun.17, 2015, the hull of the ALGOMA PROGRESS is being dismantled and scrapped at the Marine Recycling Corp. site on the Welland Canal at Port Colborne. Also, the front-pilothouse-steamer AMERICAN FORTITUDE (reg. at Wilmington, Del.) is seen, waiting for scrapping, and the JADRAN (formerly known in Toronto as Captain John's Seafood Restaurant) is also seen, waiting to be scrapped. By Aug.1, 2015 (as seen at 02:16), the JADRAN has had her superstructure removed almost down to the hull, while large sections of the superstructure now sit on the shore. Also see my video of JADRAN being towed into the Welland Canal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=irZc4nvwKuk
https://wn.com/Captain_John's_Ship_Jadran_Scrapped
Asbestosis: The slow poison killing ship-breaking workers

Asbestosis: The slow poison killing ship-breaking workers

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:51
  • Updated: 02 Feb 2017
  • views: 233
videos
Workers' deaths at the ship-breaking yards of Chittagong are a common incident, as is environmental poisoning. But researchers have now detected one deadly illness that has been silently affecting the workers for decades. Many ships that come to the yards are filled with the mineral asbestos, used in the 1980s and '90s for insulation on high-heat areas such as boilers and steam pipes. It has since been banned across the world for safety concerns. In a recent study, Bangladesh Occupational Safety, Health and Environment Foundation (OSHE) found that almost 33% of the ship-breaking workers are affected by asbestosis, an incurable disease caused by breathing the mineral in the form of dust or fume.
https://wn.com/Asbestosis_The_Slow_Poison_Killing_Ship_Breaking_Workers
Ship breaking workers daily life

Ship breaking workers daily life

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:58
  • Updated: 25 Jun 2015
  • views: 105
videos https://wn.com/Ship_Breaking_Workers_Daily_Life
Biggest cruise ship catastrophe ever

Biggest cruise ship catastrophe ever

  • Order:
  • Duration: 58:47
  • Updated: 25 Jun 2017
  • views: 10826
videos
Disaster at sea - cruise ship disaster shipwreck. Costa Concordia (Italian pronunciation: [ˈkɔsta konˈkɔrdja]) was a Concordia-class cruise ship built in 2004 by the Fincantieri's Sestri Ponente yards in Italy and operated from 2005 until 2012 by Costa Crociere (a subsidiary of Carnival Corporation). It was wrecked off the coast of Isola del Giglio in Italy on 13 January 2012. The ship was damaged due to a contact with a submerged rock and capsized hours later and was subsequently declared a total loss and later towed to the port of Genoa where scrapping operations began.[3] The name Concordia was intended to express the wish for "continuing harmony, unity, and peace between European nations."[4] Costa Concordia was the first of the Concordia-class cruise ships, followed by similar ships Costa Serena, Costa Pacifica, Costa Favolosa and Costa Fascinosa, and Carnival Splendor built for Carnival Cruise Lines. When the 114,137 gross tonnage (GT) Costa Concordia and its sister ships entered service, they were among the largest ships built in Italy until the construction of the 130,000 GT Dream-class cruise ships. On 13 January 2012 at 21:45, in calm seas and overcast weather, under the command of Captain Francesco Schettino, Costa Concordia struck a rock in the Tyrrhenian Sea just off the eastern shore of Isola del Giglio, on the western coast of Italy about 100 km (62 mi) northwest of Rome.[5][6] This tore open a 50 m (160 ft) gash on the port side of her hull, which soon flooded parts of the engine room resulting in power losses, leading to a loss of propulsion and loss of electrical systems, which crippled the ship. With water flooding in and the ship listing, she drifted back to Giglio Island, where she grounded 500 m (550 yd) north of the village of Giglio Porto, resting on her starboard side in shallow waters, with most of her starboard side underwater.[7][8] Despite the gradual sinking of the ship, its complete loss of power, and its proximity to shore in calm seas, an order to abandon ship was not issued until over an hour after the initial impact. Although international maritime law requires all passengers to be evacuated within 30 minutes of an order to abandon ship, the evacuation of Costa Concordia took over six hours and not all passengers were evacuated. Of the 3229 passengers and 1023 crew known to have been aboard, 32 died.
https://wn.com/Biggest_Cruise_Ship_Catastrophe_Ever
Ship Breaking in Bangladesh

Ship Breaking in Bangladesh

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:23
  • Updated: 22 Sep 2009
  • views: 2550
videos
Children are among the 30,000 workers who labor under perilous and grueling conditions in Bangladesh to break apart ships that once carried the freight of the worlds G-20 nations, according to a report issued today by the National Labor Committee. The new report, Where Ships and Workers Go to Die: Ship-breaking in Bangladesh and the Failure of Global Institutions to Protect Worker Rights, documents the plight of workers who dismantle ships of the G-20, working 12-hour shifts, seven days a week, under primitive conditions for wages of just 22 to 32 cents an hour—doing one of the most dangerous jobs in the world. Charles Kernaghan, director of the National Labor Committee, challenged the G-20 ministers to take up the issue: The G-20 leaders must be held accountable for having miserably failed workers across the developing world, workers who continue to be injured, cheated, maimed, paralyzed and killed on a daily basis .
https://wn.com/Ship_Breaking_In_Bangladesh
Ship Recycling Yard

Ship Recycling Yard

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:40
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
  • views: 247
videos https://wn.com/Ship_Recycling_Yard
Customer feedback from Mr Barkat CEO of S N Corporation Green ship recycling yard .

Customer feedback from Mr Barkat CEO of S N Corporation Green ship recycling yard .

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:36
  • Updated: 05 Feb 2011
  • views: 48
videos
Customer feedback from Mr Barkat CEO of S N Corporation Green ship recycling yard for ISO & OHSAS consulting and training by Netpeckers & GESS
https://wn.com/Customer_Feedback_From_Mr_Barkat_Ceo_Of_S_N_Corporation_Green_Ship_Recycling_Yard_.
×